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WHAT IS EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL (EVOO) AND HOW DOES IT DIFFER FROM OTHERS

Extra virgin olive oil, or EVOO (an acronym for extra virgin olive oil), is the product obtained from pressing olives. This must occur through purely mechanical processes under conditions that do not cause alterations to the oil.




DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VIRGIN AND EXTRA VIRGIN OIL

Both extra virgin and virgin oil come from the first pressing of olives. The difference lies in their sensory qualities and acidity levels. For extra virgin oil, the acidity limit is set at 0.8 grams per 100 grams, while for virgin oil, the maximum limit is 2 grams per 100 grams.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OLIVE OIL AND EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

Extra virgin olive oil must be pure and possess well-defined chemical and sensory characteristics: color, aroma, consistency, and acidity, which must not exceed 0.8 grams per 100 grams. Furthermore, extra virgin oil is always obtained solely through mechanical processes. When olives reach the right maturity, they are handpicked and pressed using specific machinery. The process, in short, involves washing the fruits, separating them from leaves, milling, centrifugation, and possibly filtration. It is important to note that European Regulation No. 2568/91 has established precise quality standards for olive oil to be sold and labeled as "Extra Virgin Olive Oil." In addition to the mentioned acidity threshold, this product must be extracted using cold mechanical tools at temperatures not exceeding 27 degrees.

Olive oil, on the other hand, is a blend of refined oil (obtained using chemical substances) and virgin oil. In this case, the acidity level must not exceed 1 gram per 100 grams.


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